Adamantine

adamantine072710by Shin Yu Pai
White Pine Press, 2010

Drawn from global news stories, the subjects of these poems range from the tallest man in the world, an Olympic medalist, and a burning monk to a family stranded in the Oregon wilderness. A suite of poems contemplates the work of Goya, Warhol, Rothko, Cornell, and Calder, as well as the work of artists and craftsmen from the Eastern traditions.

Shin Yu Pai, born in 1975, is a second-generation Taiwanese-American. She received her MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago, and is currently assistant curator for the Wittliff Collections. She has published eight books of poems and been anthologized in America Zen: A Gathering of Poets and The Wisdom Anthology of North American Buddhist Poetry. (adapted from the publisher’s website)

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Rhapsody in Black: Poems

51SYQfBrWaLby Jidi Majia; translated by Denis Mair
University of Oklahoma Press, 2014

An indigenous poet of the Nuosu (Yi) people of mountainous southwestern China, Jidi Majia is well known and celebrated among the Chinese. But his lyrical and worldly work, though widely published and honored, has not found its voice in English translation in the West. The poems in Rhapsody in Black, presented in Chinese and deftly translated by the gifted and respected Denis Mair, at long last introduce the English-speaking world to this remarkable Chinese writer. The poetry of Jidi Majia is deeply grounded in the myths and oral traditions of the Nuosu minority. It evokes times past but also speaks with eloquence of our global moment. Replete with cultural textures and local idiom, the poems provide an exquisite opening into the Nuosu world. In their ethnic richness, they also resonate with the voices of the indigenous and the dispossessed, from Native American and South American Indian poets to the African American and aboriginal Australian writers preserving and reshaping cultural identity. (Publisher’s description)

Jidi Majia was born in in Daliangshan, Sichuan, in 1961. He is the author of more than twenty collections of poetry. His work has been published in more than ten poetry anthologies, and has been translated into several languages. In 2006, he became the vice president of the China Poetry Association. Denis Mair has translated the work of numerous Chinese poets into English, including the volumes Reading the Times: Poems of Yan Zhi and Selected Poems by Mai Chen.

The Rose of Time: New & Selected Poems

51VajHwqrtLby Bei Dao
Edited by Eliot Weinberger
New Directions, 2010

The Rose of Time: New & Selected Poems is the newest collection from contemporary Chinese poet Bei Dao, spanning his entire writing career. Distinguished by humanist philosophies and experimental techniques, Bei Dao creates an alternative reality that can be sullen, bitter, and violent, yet also fertile and hopeful. His work attempts to understand the nature of identity, public and private afflictions, and human problems grounded in all modern societies. This bilingual edition includes a preface form the author and an afterward by the editor, Eliot Weinberger. (Publisher’s Description)

Bei Dao (born Zhao Zhenkai, 1949 in Beijing, China) founded the literary magazine Today (Jintian) along with Mank Ke. Bei Dao’s poems have been used as political anthems and humanistic tropes, most notably in the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. His work has been translated into twenty-five langauges. Bei Dao is currently a Professor of Humanities at the University of Hong Kong.

The Autochthon Poems

poems
by Simon Perchik
Split Shift, 2001

Simon Perchik was born in Paterson, New Jersey. He is best known for his personal, non-narrative style of poetry. In addition to The Autochthon Poems, Perchik has published seventeen books. His works have appeared in numerous print magazines, including The New Yorker, Partisan Review, AGNI, Poetry, The Nation, North American Review, Weave Magazine, Beloit, and CLUTCH .

Winter Sun

by Shi Zhi
translated by Jonathan Stalling
University of Oklahoma Press, 2012.

By presenting Shi Zhi’s poems in chronological order, Winter Sun allows readers to appreciate the evolution of his poetry from his earliest work to his most recent poems. (Publisher’s Description)

Born as Guo Lusheng in 1948, at the height of the Chinese Civil War, Shi Zhi joined the People’s Liberation Army at the age of twenty-three. Discharged early, he entered into a period of severe depression and spent much of the next three decades living in mental hospitals under harsh conditions. Taking the pen name of Shi Zhi, meaning “index finger,” to evoke the image of people pointing at his back, he continued to write poetry throughout these tumultuous years.