Sacrament: Homage to a River

by Rebecca Lawton
photography by Geoff Fricker
Heyday, 2013

153757157.XDu14WJiIn Sacrament: Homage to a River, Geoff Fricker’s atmospheric photographs reveal the geology, salmon runs, fluvial morphology, and human impact of the Sacramento River. In dreamlike black and white, the river takes on mythic proportions, in both its wild eco-systems and its human-made influences. Interwoven with Fricker’s images are Rebecca Lawton’s eloquent descriptions of the beauty of the river and the issues that currently surround it. (from Amazon.com)

  Rebecca Lawton’s  essay collection Reading Water: Lessons from the River was a San Francisco Chronicle Bay Area Bestseller. She currently serves on the board of directors for Friends of the River.

Geoff Fricker’s photographs are in the permanent collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Oakland Museum of California, the Crocker Art Museum, the Library of Congress, and in other collections in California, Hawai‘i, Arizona, Nevada, and Texas.

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Lines for Birds

poems and paintingspoems & paintings
by Barry Hill & John Wolseley

Lines for Birds is the result of a collaboration between painter John Wolseley and award-winning poet Barry Hill. The book follows the flight paths and habitats of birds, from the Victorian Mallee to the forests of South East Asia, to Japan and the south of France. (Publisher’s Description)

Barry Hill grew up in a coastal, Melbourne suburb in Australia, and since childhood has had a fascination with birds. He writes, “The whole experience of heading west on foot, out across those paddocks miles from the built up area, was inseparable from a sense of being as free as the hawks above us. Fragility and wildness—that’s how birds penetrated me as a kid.”  John Wolseley was born in England and spent much of his childhood outdoors among native birds and eventually migrated to Australia where, as he puts it, “birds and their songs followed me in a succession of homes and campsites in the scrub.”

(Taken from the back cover: “When a bird arrives, quite literally, into our space, it constitutes a burning moment in time, one which instantly seems to possess a memorable vibration. Birds have a natural, real presence. It is unqualified. That is their power. At the same time, their presence is constantly mediated by our culture, which sets off other vibrations, including spiritual ones.”)

The Last Atoll: Exploring Hawaiʻi’s Endangered Ecosystems

13238238-_uy475_ss475_by Pamela Frierson
Trinity University Press (forthcoming)

The Last Atoll: Exploring Hawai’i’s Endangered Ecosystems is Pamela Frierson’s first-person account of her journey up the Hawaiian Archipelago to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The most commonly known islands of the archipelago, from east to northwest,  are Hawaiʻi, Maui, Kahoʻolawe, Lānaʻi, Molokaʻi, Oʻahu, Kauaʻi, and Niʻihau.  The distance from the eastern shore of Hawaiʻi island to the western shore of Niʻihau is roughly 380 miles.  The entire archipelago, however, stretches for about another 900 miles to the northwest. On the tiny islands beyond Niʻihau, ecosystems are allowed to exist more or less untouched by the urbanization that is occurring on the principal islands of Hawaiʻi, especially on Oʻahu. Although these ecosystems remain mostly undisturbed, they are beginning to feel the effects of the world beyond their shores.

Pamela Frierson is the author of The Burning Island, and numerous articles and essays about the Pacific world. Her work has appeared in several anthologies, including The World Between Waves, A Thousand Leagues of Blue, and Intimate Nature. She is one of forty-four writers invited by Barry Lopez to write original work for Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape, featured on NPR’s “Living on Earth” program. In 2012, she received the Hawai`i Elliot Cades Award.