Greater Tibet: An Examination of Borders, Ethnic Boundaries, and Communal Areas

https://i0.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41-Uy0UyIJL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgedited by P. Christiaan Klieger
Lexington Books, 2016

The term Greater Tibet is inclusive of all peoples who generally speak languages from the Tibetan branch of the Tibeto-Burman family, have a concept of mutual origination, and share some common historical narratives: peoples from the Central Asian Republics, Pakistan, India, Nepal Bhutan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, People’s Republic of China, Mongolia, Russia, and Tibetan people in diaspora abroad. The term may even include practitioners of Tibetan Buddhism who are not of Tibetan origin, and Tibetan peoples who do not practice Buddhism. Greater Tibet thus refers to an area many times larger than the current Tibet Autonomous Region in China.  This collection of papers was inspired by a panel on Greater Tibet held at the XIIIth meeting of the International Association of Tibet Studies in Ulaan Baatar in 2013. Participants were leading Tibet scholars, experts in international law, and Tibetan officials. Topics covered include Tibetan refugees, immigrants, Tibet’s relations with India, China, and the Russian Federation. The papers suffer from poor editing, but are a welcome addition to readings about the area. (Adapted from publisher’s description)

P. Christiaan Klieger is an American anthropologist and Tibetologist at the California Academy of Science in San Francisco.

Sea Home: A Novel

51dnpc8iusl-_sx322_bo1204203200_by Phyllis Gray Young
Lightning Source International, 2015

Part contemporary sea tale, part imaginative fable, Sea Home follows one woman’s passage into a new life. As a girl, Rosie Fields dreamed of a sea home and a metamorphosis. As a grownup, in the routine rhythms of her job as a nurse, she loses sight of her ocean dream until she falls in love with a stranger who unexpectedly enters her life. Together they embark on a journey that takes her from a research vessel in Hawaiian waters to the landscapes of Italy, England, and the Azores. While her lover studies the evolutionary history of squids, she reflects on the past–the father who died when she was a child and the nearly forgotten sea stories he told her. Rosie struggles to reclaim the stories along with her dreams, and to find the sea home that seems just beyond her reach. (Publisher’s description)

Phyllis Gray Young is a retired nurse. She lives and writes in Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

Ruined City: A Novel (Chinese Literature Today Book Series)

41lj7pwnbhlby Jia Pingwa
University of Oklahoma Press, 2016

Originally published in 1993, Ruined City (Fei Du) was banned by China’s State Publishing Administration for its explicit sexual content. Since then, Jia Pingwa’s novel of contemporary China’s social and economic transformation has become a bestseller. The story of a famous contemporary writer’s sexual and legal tangles, the novel uses comedy and parody to comment on issues of intellectual seriousness, censorship, and artistic integrity in a changing Chinese society. (Adapted from publisher’s description)

Jia Pingwa (1952- ) stands with Mo Yan and Yu Hua as one of the most prominent and prolific novelists in contemporary Chinese literature. His novels, short stories and essays have a large readership in mainland China, as well as in Hong Kong and Taiwan. The French translation of Ruined City won the French Prix Femina in 1997.

Steep Tea

by Jee Leong Koh
Carcanet Press, 2015

koh-jee-leong-steep-teaSteep Tea is Singapore-born Jee Leong Koh’s fifth collection and the first to be published in the UK. Koh’s poems express many of the harsh and enriching circumstances of a postcolonial queer writer, in a voice both colloquial and musical. Like the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop, Eavan Boland and Lee Tzu Pheng, Koh’s writing is forged in the pleasures of reading, cultures and communities. (Adapted from publisher’s description)

“Here are short, deft narratives that map the mismatched patterns of male and female desire grounded in partial understandings of love. The author’s native Singapore sounds out sharply, often ironically, in counterpoint to the intimate domestic interiors that help to constitute what will surely be recognized as some of contemporary poetry’s classic love poems.” -David Kinloch

Jee Leong Koh was born and raised in Singapore and moved to New York in 2003. He has a BA in English from Oxford University and an MFA in Creative Writing from Sarah Lawrence College. He is the curator of the website Singapore Poetry and the cochair of the inaugural Singapore Literature Festival in New York City. He lives in New York City.

Real Life in China at the Height of Empire: Revealed by the Ghosts of Ji Xiaolan

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The Chinese University Press, 2014

Toward the end of the eighteenth century, Ji Xiaolan, widely regarded as the most eminent scholar and foremost wit of his age, published five collections of anecdotes and discourses on the interaction between the mundane and spirit worlds, and purely earthly life stories and happenings. Settings range from the milieux of peasants, servants, and merchants to those of governors and ministers, and extend to the far reaches of the Qing empire. They include pieces comparing comedy and tragedy, cruelty and kindness, corruption and integrity, erudition and ignorance, credulity and skepticism. (adapted from publisher’s website)

David E. Pollard was Professor of Chinese in the University of London and later Professor of Translation in the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His books include The True Story of Lu Xun (2002), Zhou Zuoren: Selected Essays (2006), and The Chinese Essay (1999).

Cafe Jause: A Story of Viennese Shanghai

Screen shot 2015-10-12 at 3.35.22 PMby Wena Poon
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014

Shanghai, 1936. On the eve of World War II, the Jewish, Chinese and Japanese customers of a famous Viennese café on Zhoushan Road get together for an international project: to bake the ‘king of the cakes’, the legendary German baumkuchen. Illustrated with modern and vintage photography. (Amazon.com)

American novelist Wena Poon is the author of ten books of fiction, often exploring diaspora culture, transnational identity, and gender. Her stories have been widely anthologized and translated into French, Italian, and Chinese.

 

Waterman: The Life and Times of Duke Kahanamoku

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University of Nebraska Press, 2015

Waterman is the first comprehensive biography of Duke Kahanamoku (1890–1968): swimmer, surfer, Olympic gold medalist, Hawaiian icon, and waterman. Kahanamoku become America’s first superstar Olympic swimmer. He was at the top of the world rankings for more than a decade; his rivalry with Johnny Weissmuller transformed competitive swimming from an insignificant sideshow into a headliner event. Kahanamoku used his Olympic renown to introduce the sport of surfing, an activity unknown outside the Hawaiian Islands, to the world. Kahanamoku’s connection to his homeland was equally important. Born when Hawai‘i was an independent kingdom, he served as the sheriff of Honolulu during the attack on Pearl Harbor and World War II, and as a globetrotting “Ambassador of Aloha” afterward. He died shortly after Hawai‘i became a state. (Adapted from the publisher’s website.)

David Davis is the author of three books on sports history. His work has appeared in anthologies including The Best American Sports Writing.