Greater Tibet: An Examination of Borders, Ethnic Boundaries, and Communal Areas

https://i0.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41-Uy0UyIJL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgedited by P. Christiaan Klieger
Lexington Books, 2016

The term Greater Tibet is inclusive of all peoples who generally speak languages from the Tibetan branch of the Tibeto-Burman family, have a concept of mutual origination, and share some common historical narratives: peoples from the Central Asian Republics, Pakistan, India, Nepal Bhutan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, People’s Republic of China, Mongolia, Russia, and Tibetan people in diaspora abroad. The term may even include practitioners of Tibetan Buddhism who are not of Tibetan origin, and Tibetan peoples who do not practice Buddhism. Greater Tibet thus refers to an area many times larger than the current Tibet Autonomous Region in China.  This collection of papers was inspired by a panel on Greater Tibet held at the XIIIth meeting of the International Association of Tibet Studies in Ulaan Baatar in 2013. Participants were leading Tibet scholars, experts in international law, and Tibetan officials. Topics covered include Tibetan refugees, immigrants, Tibet’s relations with India, China, and the Russian Federation. The papers suffer from poor editing, but are a welcome addition to readings about the area. (Adapted from publisher’s description)

P. Christiaan Klieger is an American anthropologist and Tibetologist at the California Academy of Science in San Francisco.

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