Candy: A Novel of Love and Addiction


By Luke Davies

Ballantine Books, 1998.

Like Trainspotting, Candy depicts heroin addicts in a British subculture, but it is set in Australia, not Scotland. “Candy” is the slang name of the unnamed narrator’s two great loves: his girlfriend and heroin. He introduces her to the drug, and they descend from being high on life, love, and drugs, to being shamed through prostitution, crime, addiction, and recovery. With no character background, the book reads as a string of scams to score money and heroin: some hilarious, some desperate, and some both at once. One scam starts when they answer a ringing public phone that the caller mistakenly believes is a suicide prevention line. Candy and the narrator are ruthless but human; their likableness and the immediacy of their dramas make them sympathetic even when pathetic. The writing is lean and strong but offers no resolution. Although that reflects junkies’ reality, sometimes the pacing is jarring as the characters take action long after the audience is ready. Still, the good writing, realistic portrayal, and affable characters plunge readers into the junkies’ world, safely returning them with veins intact. (Booklist)

Luke Davies was born in Sydney in 1962. He is currently on an Australia Council writers’ fellowship and has worked variously as a teacher, journalist and script editor. Luke Davies’ collection of poetry Absolute Event Horizon was shortlisted for the 1995 Turnbull Fox Phillips poetry prize.

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