Inheriting the War: Poetry and Prose by Descendants of Vietnam Veterans and Refugees

980bc04e50f7eba0586b67f750fe2c01edited Laren McClung
foreword by Yusef Komunyakaa
W.W. Norton & Company, 2018

Inheriting the War: Poetry and Prose by Descendants of Vietnam Veterans and Refugees answers questions that have remained unanswered for over fifty years: what is the difference between history and the past, how do people come to terms to what they have inherited, who is given a voice and who remains silent, and what resolutions result from examining the past. This anthology by descendants of Vietnam veterans and refugees―American, Vietnamese, Vietnamese Diaspora, Hmong, Australian, and others―confronts war and its aftermath. It is an affecting portrait of the effects of war and family―an intercultural, generational dialogue on silence, memory, landscape, imagination, Agent Orange, displacement, postwar trauma, and the severe realities that are carried home.

While Inheriting the War depicts the burdens of the war, and refuses to deny brutal realities, it presents literature that unifies. It crosses cultural and generational boundaries, and connects veterans, writers, and readers. (Adapted from publisher’s description and press release)

Laren McClung teaches at New York University, and is a poet and the author of Between Here and Monkey Mountain. Her father served one tour in Vietnam (1968-1969) deployed with the 173rd Airborne. Her poetry has appeared in several journals and reviews, and she has been the recipient of a Teachers & Writers Collaborative Van Lier Fellowship, an Iraq and Afghanistan Veteran Workshop Teaching Fellowship, and has led workshops in poetry at Goldwater Hospital on Roosevelt Island in the Creative Writing Program at New York University.

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Tracks Along the Left Coast

51er9-Er4gLby Andrew Schelling
Counterpoint Press, 2017

Tracks Along the Left Coast: Jaime de Angulo & Pacific Coast Culture is a story of the life of the Old Coyote of Big Sur, Jaime de Angulo. In addition to being a tale capturing de Angulo’s time as a cowboy, miner, poet, doctor, linguist, and ethnomusicologist, the book provides insight on the persecuted Native Californian cultures and languages that have endured to modern times.

Jaime de Angulo’s poetry and prose represented the bohemian sensibilities of the twenties, thirties, and forties. He was also known for his reworkings of coyote tales and shamanic mysticism. (Adapted from publisher’s description)

Andrew Schelling has written or edited twenty books, including Love and the Turning Seasons: India’s Poetry and Erotic Longing. For over twenty years he’s been teaching at Naropa University’s Jack Kerouac School and also teaches at Deer Park Institute, in Himachal Pradesh, India.

Jaime de Angulo (1887-1950) was born in Paris to Spanish parents. At eighteen, he fled to America to become a cowboy. In his lifetime, he was also a rancher, doctor, lecturer, anthropologist, linguist, and musicologist, as well as wrote poetry and fiction. He also published articles on indigenous languages and music systems of Northern California and Mexico. The year before he died, he broadcasted retellings of Native Californian myths and stories over the radio, which are still available today.

Benedicta Takes Wing

Montes_BendictaTakesWing

by Veronica Montes
Philippine American Literary House, 2018

Benedicta Takes Wing and Other Stories is a collection of fourteen fictional stories focused on Filipino families. It explores their struggles as navigate through a world influenced by both their native customs and American media. It depicts the grief and joy, and denials and affections that keep these families together. (Adapted from publisher’s description)

Veronica Montes is a Filipino-American writer who lives in the Bay Area of Northern California. Her stories are inspired by the Filipino and mainstream American cultures that she grew up in.

Old Demons, New Deities

Dickie_OldDemonsNewDeities

edited by Tenzin Dickie
OR Books, New York and London, 2017

Old Demons, New Deities is the first anthology of contemporary Tibetan fiction available in English. Though Tibetan literature dates back millennia, its modern form is under forty years old. It began in 1980 and 1981 with literary journals, Tibetan Art and Literature and Light Rain.

In this book, readers will get an authentic look at the the lives of Tibetans in various settings such as the Himalayas, India, and New York, as they understand the relationships between tradition and modernity, occupation and exile, and the personal and the national. (Adapted from publisher’s description)

Tenzin Dickie is a writer and literary translator living in New York. Her writings have been published in Indian Literature, Apogee Journal, Tibetan Review, Himal SouthAsian, and Cultural Anthropology, and anthologized in The Yellow Nib: Modern English Poetry by Indians from The Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry and The Tibet Reader, forthcoming from the Duke University Press. Her translations have been published in The Washington Post online and Modern Poetry in Translation. She is an editor at treasuryoflives.org, a biographical encyclopedia of significant figures from Tibet, Inner Asia, and the Himalayan Region.

 

The Newspaper Widow

The Newspaper Widowby Cecilia Manguerra Brainard
University of Santo Tomas Publishing House, 2017

Set in 1909, during the early years of American occupation in the Philippines, The Newspaper Widow tells the story of a woman who searches for answers to a murder so that she may free her son from jail. While the story begins as a murder mystery, it develops into an exploration of the meanings of love, loyalty, and friendship.

The Newspaper Widow was inspired by the story of Cecilia Brainard’s great-grandmother, who was widowed at the age of thirty-nine and took over Imprenta Rosario, her late husband’s press in Cebu, Philippines. (Adapted from publisher’s description and press release)

Cecilia Brainard teaches creative writing at UCLA-Extension.

On Not Losing My Father’s Ashes in the Flood

OnNotLosingMyFather'sAshesintheFloodby Richard Harrison
Wolsak & Wynn Publishers, 2016

In 2013, Richard Harrison feared that his father’s ashes were lost in the flood that had devastated Alberta.

Using elements of memoir, elegy, lyrical essay, and personal correspondence, as well as showing his appreciation for haiku and comic books, Harrison has written a book of mourning for his father. Despite dementia, Harrison’s father died without forgetting the poems that he had memorized as a student and taught his son. (Adapted from publisher’s description)

A Canadian writer and professor at Calgary’s Mount Royal University, Harrison is the author of seven books of poetry, including Big Breath of a Wish, a volume about his daughter’s acquisition of language, and Hero of the Play, the first collection of poetry launched at the Hockey Hall of Fame. His poetry has been translated into French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Arabic.

Unearthing the Polynesian Past: Explorations and Adventures of an Island Archaeologist

KirchBookby Patrick Vinton Kirch
University of Hawai‘i Press, 2015

In this memoir, archaeologist Patrick Vinton Kirch describes his fieldwork in over two dozen islands in the Pacific.

Kirch started out as an intern under Bishop Museum zoologist Yoshio Kondo and took part in archaeological digs on the islands of Hawai‘i and Maui. During his high school years at Punahou, he apprenticed with eminent archaeologist Kenneth Emory. After Kirch obtained his anthropology degree from the University of Pennsylvania, he joined a Bishop Museum expedition to Anuta Island, where a traditional Polynesian culture still flourished. He went on to earn his doctorate at Yale University with a study of the traditional irrigation-based chiefdoms of Futuna Island. Since then, Kirch has worked with ecologists, soil scientists, and paleontologists to explain how Polynesians adapted to and altered their island ecosystems.

In Unearthing the Polynesian Past, Kirch reflects on how archaeological methods have advanced and how knowledge of the Polynesian past has developed. (Adapted from publisher’s description)

Patrick Vinton Kirch is Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley.